Tag Archive: marketing_strategy

7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Seasonby Jennifer Shaheen. 

7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season. 7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season. If you’re in e-commerce, you know the crucial holiday selling season is right around the corner. And with consumers looking for the best deals—and Amazon expanding the range of products and services it offers—it’s getting increasingly difficult for independent retailers to compete.

With these concerns in mind, we turned to leading e-commerce experts to ask them what small business owners need to do right now to enjoy a more profitable holiday season.

 

1. Seed the ground now for holiday sales

In an environment of economic uncertainty, customers want to make the most out of their purchasing dollar. Ron Rule, an e-commerce engagement expert, urges retailers to start offering gift cards on their websites now. “There is a psychological difference between gift cards and coupons and they’re perceived differently by buyers,” he says. “A coupon means you’re saving money, but a gift card is money.” These gift cards can be used to make additional holiday purchases, boosting your customer’s buying power. “In the end, you’re still just discounting your order but that difference in perception to the buyer will make result in a better response than a coupon of the same value,” Rule adds.

7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

 

2. Time is of the essence

For every person who’s starting their holiday shopping right now, there are plenty who wait until the very last minute. That’s why it’s important to be clear about your delivery times, according to Andrew Youderian. The author of Profitable e-Commerce operates several e-commerce businesses. “Shipping times are always important to communicate clearly, but there’s no other time of the year when it’s as important to get it right as during the holiday season,” he says. “At the forefront of most shoppers’ minds is: ‘Will this be here in time?’”

 

Amazon Prime’s two-day delivery has made it an incredibly popular option among holiday shoppers. When you’re competing with Amazon, you need to provide the same level of service. Details matter, Youderian says, adding, “Make sure you’re very explicit about when items will ship and, more importantly, when you guarantee they will arrive. Don’t simply say things like ‘Three-Day Shipping’. Instead, give an exact arrival time so customers don’t have to guess or calculate themselves.” 7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

 

Highlight your recommended products

“Gift buyers want to get the perfect gift with the least amount of research,” says Youderian. “So while they know Dad would love a new power drill, they really aren’t interested in researching tools for two hours to find it. Make life easier on them, and prominently recommend your top-selling products, and the best choices for different types of applications and users.” Top-of-the-page placement is often best, as it helps you capture the attention of shoppers too busy to scroll down. “Keeping these recommendations short, specific, and to the point will dramatically increase the chance of the shopper buying that gift from you,” he says.”

 

4. Reach out to existing customers

Remember to re-engage past customers, says Rule. “It’s a million times easier to sell to someone who’s already purchased from you than it is to attract a new customer,” he says. “The best way is to segment your customer list based on what they’ve previously purchased and email them a promotion on something else they’re likely to buy. Even sending the same message to everyone is better than doing nothing.” 7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

 

5. Build demand through strategic blogger outreach

Terry Lin, creator of the podcast, Build My Online Store, recommends reaching out to bloggers as a long-term strategy to boost holiday sales. “Bloggers enjoy sharing new stuff they like with their audience, so reaching out and sending them a sample to provide a product review, or working together to host a giveaway contest is a great way to get started,” he says. “In addition, you’ll also get on the radar of other bloggers in the market as the recognition snowballs over time.” The fall season is the ideal time to leverage established blogger relationships by asking for their input and participation in holiday marketing campaigns.

 

6. Don’t forget to say thank you

“Using a smartphone, record a 60-second  thank you video and send it out to all your customers over the past year giving them a quick update on the business, and include a coupon code at the end of the video thanking them for their support,” Lin say. “People buy from brands they know, like, and trust, and nothing conveys this better than seeing the owner of the business in a video. Once it’s recorded, promote it across your social media channels, email list, friends, family, and colleagues.” 7 E-commerce Strategy Tips for a More Profitable Holiday Season

 

How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Salesby Jennifer Shaheen.

 

How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales. There are three reasons why retailers should want to use the recommended product feature on their websites, explains Dave Huckaby, author of the Grabapple Guide to E-Commerce. “You increase conversion rates, increase ticket size, and increase user engagement,” he says. “Amazon is the king of product recommendations, and we can all learn from their example.”

 

Carol Friedman, owner of Books to Bed, which sells children’s sleepwear, agrees. “I wanted the Amazon effect,” she says. “After adding the recommended product feature to our website, we saw an increase in how long our visitors were staying on our website. And the longer they stay, the more they spend.”

 

Making the most of the recommended products feature

There are two ways for a retailer to add the recommended product feature. The first option, custom-coded websites, generally incorporate a SAAS (software as a service)-based solution where a third party manages the recommended product feature for a monthly fee. Custom coded websites are a pricey option, costing at least $5,000, which Huckaby says is typically out of reach for many small businesses. On the other hand, a majority of e-commerce sites, including Shopify, Yahoo Stores, and Big Commerce, incorporate a recommended product functionality as part of their standard package, with enhanced versions available as an upgrade. How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

 

“It’s one thing to have a recommended products feature, it’s another thing to use it strategically,” says Linda Bustos, director of e-commerce research at Elastic Path, a provider of e-commerce software. “The biggest mistake is using defaults out of the box, and not applying appropriate merchandising rules to your tools.

 

Taking a hands-on approach is essential to success with the recommendation products feature, Bustos adds. “The key is to begin with your sales strategy, and ensure your tool is set up to deliver you goals. Systems that automatically generate recommendations require some behind-the-scenes fine-tuning to ensure that your customers are seeing the products you want them to see. How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

 

“Whichever platform you choose, take a quick run through the instructions, watch any videos the host may provide, and see what the tool’s limitations are,” Huckaby recommends. “The best way to learn the software is to just start playing with it. See what you can do and what you can’t.”

 

eCommerce_PQ.jpgHuckaby, who uses Big Commerce to host his own e-commerce sites, used this method to discover a problem. “On the categories pages on my site, there’s lots of relevant text, which is great for Google, but that text is the first thing the customer sees.” he says.  “They have to scroll down to see the product. I had to go into the code and fix that myself. It’s an example of how these solutions aren’t necessarily tailored to the needs of the retailer. You have to be willing to go in and tweak them.”

 

Location is everything: The best place to display product recommendations

“Where you show product recommendations matters,” Bustos says. “It’s very common to do so on a product page, but you can also use the recommended product feature to display merchandise on your home page based on past visit viewing behavior or incoming search terms. You can also make use of the recommended product feature right after the action ‘add to cart’ and on your cart page.” How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

 

“You want to alter your product recommendations based on where your customer is in the buying process,” Huckaby adds. “If your customer is looking at bass boats, for example, you can recommend other bass boats. But if they’ve started spending a lot of time looking at one particular bass boat, you’ll want to display trolling motors, oar locks—the type of add-on items that would increase their satisfaction with the purchase. Once they have that boat in their shopping cart, you want to recommend the specific bolt-on accessories that are made for that particular bass boat.”

 

Creating your own recommended products feature

Using your site-search feature, you can create your own recommended products feature if the results you’re getting from your embedded tool aren’t satisfactory. “Let’s say during the holiday season you want to offer gift sets containing several items, but your system doesn’t have the capacity,” Huckaby says. “Making use of your site-search feature, you can do a search by tags to include all of the gift sets. Then you save this search as a static web page, and link to it from your product page. When customers click on the link, they’re presented with all of the gift sets.” How Recommendations can Boost E-Commerce Sales

 

Test everything

“As the store owner, you want to keep a log,” Huckaby says. “Track your results over 90 days to see how things are working. Then, if you go in and make some tweaks, you’ll want to track those as well.”

 

Bustos also recommends extensive testing of the recommended product feature. Her list of what to look at includes where the recommendations are placed; how many per page; and the price points. She also advises retailers to use language such as “you might like” and “recommended for you” rather than “similar item” or “goes perfect with.”

 

Ring It Up: How smartphone point-of-sale services can help bring in more cash

by Erin McDermott.

At the Laurie’s Chocolates stand at the Ottsville Farmers’ Market in Pennsylvania, an intoxicating scent emanates from the handcrafted blends, from the balsamic and Merlot truffles, to the steaming pot of hot cocoa.

Some other flavors now in the mix: MasterCard and Visa.

Standing behind the table loaded with her confections at the bustling weekend market, chocolatier Laurie Douglass is more than happy to take credit cards, and does so with her Android mobile phone connected to a small swipe device. Laurie’s Chocolates has been in business for 10 years and Douglass says the payment alternative has been a big boost at events, where sometimes she says she takes in almost half of her sales this way. Through just the first two months of 2012, Douglass said her smartphone-based sales reached half of her total mobile app sales for last year, which included her busy Christmas season.

Welcome to the new world of mobile payments. A flotilla of iPads, tablets, and smartphones are giving small businesses inexpensive new ways to tap customers’ plastic in an increasingly cash-less society. Last year, mobile commerce sales in the U.S. were expected to hit $5.3 billion, up 83 percent from 2010, according to Barclays Capital. Forrester Research projects that figure will climb to $31 billion by 2016.

RingItUp_PQ.jpgThe technology is becoming increasingly visible, from Girl Scout troops selling cookies to the political footmen fundraising in the field for the Obama and Romney presidential campaigns, to even polished ads on cable TV.

It’s also giving a much-needed boost to small businesses. And it’s not just tech-savvy entrepreneurs who are tapping in: A quick glance at the type of small business owners who are using mobile payment services shows plumbers, home inspectors, photographers, a hot-tub shop, dog-walkers, a few sandwich joints, and even a psychiatrist.

“I am seeing many service providers and solo business owners looking for payment solutions,” says Brandie Kajino, whose small-business tech consultancy is based in Vancouver, Washington. “Many of the clients I work with would like to accept payments via credit card, and these services offer a great alternative to traditional processors.”

Here’s how it works: After you choose your mobile payment provider, you download that company’s app or go to a provider’s website and register as either an individual or a business. Providers will ask for identification information, let you link to the bank account where payments should go, and set up your security measures. Once approved, you’re in business. Cards can be accepted immediately if you’re willing to punch in the numbers manually, but often an additional fee will apply if you do. Most providers will ship you their small swipe devices for free, but some are also available for purchase at electronics retailers.. The swiper plugs into the output jack of a smartphone or tablet.

From the customer’s perspective, the process is straightforward: They swipe their card and sign their name on a touch screen. They can opt to get a receipt either via email or text message.

For merchants, fees vary, but they are generally lower than traditional point-of-sale outlets. They typically run less than 3 percent on all swiped transactions, and have a higher rate (and additional, flat fees at anywhere from 15 cents to 25 cents per transaction) for manually keyed in purchases.

Most mobile payment services transfer funds to your account as soon as the next day, and many boast a free card reader and no startup fees or contracts. It’s a far cry from the cost of installing and leasing the traditional hardware necessary to accept credit cards, which can run as high as $4,000 to $5,000 for a startup. And that doesn’t include interchange and transmission fees that routinely total higher than 2.5 percent of each transaction.
http://smallbusinessonlinecommunity.bankofamerica.com/community/growing-your-business/internetecommerce/blog/2012/12/06/ring-it-up-how-smartphone-point-of-sale-services-can-help-bring-in-more-cash

Etsy Dos and Don’ts: How to navigate the web’s handmade heaven

Etsy Dos and Don’ts: How to navigate the web’s handmade heaven
Posted by SBOC Team in Internet and eCommerce on Oct 29, 2012 8:04:36 AM

Etsy_Body.jpgby Erin McDermott.

Chrystal Lynn Simmons has been on Etsy since 2006. Her products on this popular Internet marketplace for independent handmade/vintage goods reflect her own life transitions—from cool, colorful metallic bangles and necklaces to bridal accessories to baby mobiles to decorative magnets that indicate whether a dishwasher holds either clean or dirty plates.

But having all of those items under one Etsy shop shingle began to worry her. Was it “just looking nutty” to have such disconnected goods lumped together, she thought? It was time for a breakup.

Now, she has two stores, one for each batch—Metallic Muse and The Tulle Box. In just a few months, sales have more than tripled. “It took me forever to figure it out, but it seems to be paying off,” Simmons says, laughing. “I just realized I was isolating part of my clientele. People who’d come for semi-precious jewelry probably couldn’t care less about baby stuff.”

Etsy_PQ.jpgWhat began in 2005 as an online collection of artisans has now expanded to an estimated 400,000 sellers, with 1.5-billion monthly page views, and sales of more than $375 million through the first half of this year. And while many of the individual enterprises are small, some of their concerns mirror the same faced by small business everywhere, like marketing, customer relations, and cost efficiencies.

So, here’s some advice from the pros on how to navigate the world of Etsy.

DO: Become a better photographer. How to get that crisp, modern look with just a point-and-shoot? “It starts with understanding your camera. It sounds dorky and all, but pull out your manual and read it,” says Cathy Derus, a Chicago CPA by day and shopkeeper of Fiscally Chic in her free time. “You need to understand what those settings are besides ‘auto.’ It’s a lot of trial and error.” She also bought a GorillaPod tripod to steady her shots and downloaded the free Photoscape editing software to help create the right look. Why all the white backgrounds? Etsy sellers are more likely to be added to users’ Treasuries—individual galleries curated by members of projects they admire—if the items look like they’re related, says Marcia Turner, author of the forthcoming book, Complete Idiot’s Guide to Selling Your Crafts on Etsy. Her advice: Turn off the flash and head outside to shoot your product in natural light.

DON’T: Post everything all at once. Like on other social-media venues, an all-out barrage is overwhelming for viewers. Keep it at a steady trickle of new material, adding items at a rate of one a day, ensuring that your items will show up at the top of the search box on a daily basis, Turner says. When to tune in? Try times like Sunday nights, Monday mornings, and weeknights, when the biggest number of surfers are online.

DO: Spell out your shop’s policies. What’s your window for returns or exchanges? What are acceptable forms of payment? What’s your deposit policy for custom work? It’s a lot to think about, but whatever you do, don’t over-promise, several Etsy sellers say. Longer exchange allowances may encourage serial finicky buyers to change their minds, making their indecision your costly and time-consuming headache. And don’t say you’ll ship everywhere (more on this later).

DON’T: Ignore local and state business rules. “This is a business. Even if you only see it as a hobby, the government doesn’t,” says Cathy Stein, a Dallas-area owner of the EDCCollective and Eclectic Skeptic shops as well as a longtime entrepreneur and small business operator. Check with your state, city, and even your county: Rules vary all over the U.S. about the need for registering a DBA—a Doing Business As certificate—for your virtual shop. (Plus, it keeps others from taking your name.) Also, you’ll need a sales tax license. “Federal tax-wise, you have two choices: You either treat it as a business and hope you’re going to make a profit in the timeframe the IRS needs to be able to declare it as a business. Or it has to be hobby income. But it needs to be one or the other and it has to be done right,” Stein says.

DO: Get a good scale and make friends with your local post office staff. Be smart about the weight and dimensions of what you’re about to ship, and what it will do to your profit-margin calculations. Consider the costs of your packing materials and what will take to safely ship your goods. If a box surpasses the size that your advertised shipping rate reflects, the difference is going to come out of your pocket. And beware of padding the price: Turner says Etsy shoppers are well aware of the difference between “shipping” and “shipping and handling” costs, and often move on if they feel they are being charged unfairly.

http://smallbusinessonlinecommunity.bankofamerica.com/community/growing-your-business/internetecommerce/blog/2012/10/29/etsy-dos-and-don-ts-how-to-navigate-the-web-s-handmade-heaven

Sell Me Something I Don’t Know: Tips for Cross- and Upselling Customers

Sell Me Something I Don’t Know: Tips for Cross- and Upselling Customers.by Robert Lerose.

Have you ever ordered a meal at a restaurant and been asked by the waiter if you’d like a salad to go along with it? Or, just as you’re ready to buy a 42-inch flat screen TV, the salesman informs you that for just a few dollars more, you can get the 50-inch model? And, oh by the way—how about a deluxe surge protector to go along with that?

If you answered yes, then you were the subject of two well known, but infrequently used sales techniques: cross-selling and upselling.

PQ_SellMeSomething.jpgSimply put, cross-selling offers a product or service that is related to the original purchase (the salad). Upselling moves the customer to a higher-priced transaction. And both can add substantial revenue to any business.

Best leads: your existing customers

Since you’ve already spent time and money to build your house list, cross-selling and upselling to previous buyers is more cost-effective than acquiring new customers. You can leverage their loyalty and your established credibility.

“Your customers are your most valuable asset, no matter what size your business,” says Pat Friesen, who runs a Kansas City-based business strategy and copywriting agency. “Someone who knows and trusts you is more likely to buy again, buy more, and buy more often.”

For those who think that these techniques are only effective during flush times when businesses have excess capital to spend, Friesen disagrees.

Over the last couple of years, while some companies chose to hunker down and wait out the recession, a lot of smart marketers turned to their list of lapsed or inactive buyers and went after leads that they had not converted yet.

As an example, she found that insurance companies who pursued all their inactive policyholders (including lapses, cancellations, and unconverted prospects) generated handsome returns. Moreover, since they already owned the names and weren’t working from cold lists, their prospecting costs were lower.

“They’d already paid for these customers/leads. There was already a relationship of some sort established, even if it was minimal,” Friesen says. “If people were going to spend money during hard times, they wanted to make sure they trusted the people getting their money.”

Dispelling the myths of cross-selling

Businesses that are reluctant to embrace these techniques often fall back on outdated excuses about their suitability. A big misconception is that a business will come across as pushy, trying to coerce a sale that the customer doesn’t want.

“The benefit in the long run is that you can help your customer by offering additional services and products that they may not be aware you have,” says Kelley Robertson of the Robertson Training Group, an Ontario, Canada-based sales training and coaching company.

Robertson practices what he preaches by offering a CD or a book whenever he does a training session. It’s another way to stay on a customer’s radar screen and earn extra income for his own small business.

Another myth is the fear that businesses will over-communicate and turn off their customers.

Not so, says Robertson.

He will typically send out weekly emails over the course of three weeks to announce a new product or service, changing only the subject line. Even though he may turn off some subscribers, he has found that he more than makes up for it with new revenue he generates.

“As long as you continue to provide some type of value to your customers, they’ll listen to your sales letters or your sales pitches,” Robertson says.

Put a program in place

Often, sales people stop selling prematurely. One way to counteract this is to put a sales training system in place that makes it easy to learn from successes and failures. To lay the groundwork for an effective cross-selling and upselling culture in a company, Robertson recommends a simple, three-step plan.

First, create a checklist of add-on products and services. Then link them to other relevant offerings in your inventory so your sales team can see the potential universe of additional sales.

Next, instill the idea that upselling or cross-selling actually benefits the customer as well as your small business. Your customers get solutions and you generate extra revenue.

Lastly, ensure your sales people are asking enough questions to find out the goals, objectives, and problems of your customers. Once they have that information, they can better match your products and services to their situation. Hidden opportunities can often be uncovered with some targeted probing.

Robertson experienced this serendipity himself recently. During a casual conversation with one of his clients, he mentioned that he had a particular expertise that the client was in need of—and unaware that Robertson provided.

“It was one of those things that I hadn’t thought about because we had never had a conversation about that,” he recalls. “Don’t underestimate what your customer might be looking for. Take the chance. Make that suggestion.”

Whether your small business sells plumbing supplies or time management software, there are a number of ways to start the conversation:

“Mention what the customer has bought in the past, especially if there is a direct tie between the original product and what you are now offering,” Friesen says. “Also thank your customer for his/her past business. Thank you is a great way to start a letter.”

Bundle different items into one package (think McDonald’s Super-sizing) and offer it at a price that is lower than the combined price if purchased separately but more than if the customer just bought one item.

Use expert recommendations to influence behavior and drive sales. Amazon uses this method extensively, which is one reason their revenues surged over $10 billion in 2011.

Set up an auto-responder program or pop-up window on your website that automatically offers cross-selling and upselling opportunities.

Sell Me Something I Don’t Know: Tips for Cross- and Upselling Customers

Sell Me Something I Don’t Know: Tips for Cross- and Upselling Customersby Robert Lerose.  

Have you ever ordered a meal at a restaurant and been asked by the waiter if you’d like a salad to go along with it? Or, just as you’re ready to buy a 42-inch flat screen TV, the salesman informs you that for just a few dollars more, you can get the 50-inch model? And, oh by the way—how about a deluxe surge protector to go along with that?

 

If you answered yes, then you were the subject of two well known, but infrequently used sales techniques: cross-selling and upselling.

 

PQ_SellMeSomething.jpgSimply put, cross-selling offers a product or service that is related to the original purchase (the salad). Upselling moves the customer to a higher-priced transaction. And both can add substantial revenue to any business.

 

Best leads: your existing customers

Since you’ve already spent time and money to build your house list, cross-selling and upselling to previous buyers is more cost-effective than acquiring new customers. You can leverage their loyalty and your established credibility.

 

“Your customers are your most valuable asset, no matter what size your business,” says Pat Friesen, who runs a Kansas City-based business strategy and copywriting agency. “Someone who knows and trusts you is more likely to buy again, buy more, and buy more often.”

 

For those who think that these techniques are only effective during flush times when businesses have excess capital to spend, Friesen disagrees.

 

Over the last couple of years, while some companies chose to hunker down and wait out the recession, a lot of smart marketers turned to their list of lapsed or inactive buyers and went after leads that they had not converted yet.

 

As an example, she found that insurance companies who pursued all their inactive policyholders (including lapses, cancellations, and unconverted prospects) generated handsome returns. Moreover, since they already owned the names and weren’t working from cold lists, their prospecting costs were lower.

 

“They’d already paid for these customers/leads. There was already a relationship of some sort established, even if it was minimal,” Friesen says. “If people were going to spend money during hard times, they wanted to make sure they trusted the people getting their money.”

 

Dispelling the myths of cross-selling

Businesses that are reluctant to embrace these techniques often fall back on outdated excuses about their suitability. A big misconception is that a business will come across as pushy, trying to coerce a sale that the customer doesn’t want.

 

“The benefit in the long run is that you can help your customer by offering additional services and products that they may not be aware you have,” says Kelley Robertson of the Robertson Training Group, an Ontario, Canada-based sales training and coaching company.

 

Robertson practices what he preaches by offering a CD or a book whenever he does a training session. It’s another way to stay on a customer’s radar screen and earn extra income for his own small business.

 

Another myth is the fear that businesses will over-communicate and turn off their customers.

 

Not so, says Robertson.

 

He will typically send out weekly emails over the course of three weeks to announce a new product or service, changing only the subject line. Even though he may turn off some subscribers, he has found that he more than makes up for it with new revenue he generates.

 

“As long as you continue to provide some type of value to your customers, they’ll listen to your sales letters or your sales pitches,” Robertson says.

 

Put a program in place

Often, sales people stop selling prematurely. One way to counteract this is to put a sales training system in place that makes it easy to learn from successes and failures. To lay the groundwork for an effective cross-selling and upselling culture in a company, Robertson recommends a simple, three-step plan.

 

First, create a checklist of add-on products and services. Then link them to other relevant offerings in your inventory so your sales team can see the potential universe of additional sales.

 

Next, instill the idea that upselling or cross-selling actually benefits the customer as well as your small business. Your customers get solutions and you generate extra revenue.

 

Lastly, ensure your sales people are asking enough questions to find out the goals, objectives, and problems of your customers. Once they have that information, they can better match your products and services to their situation. Hidden opportunities can often be uncovered with some targeted probing.

 

Robertson experienced this serendipity himself recently. During a casual conversation with one of his clients, he mentioned that he had a particular expertise that the client was in need of—and unaware that Robertson provided.

 

“It was one of those things that I hadn’t thought about because we had never had a conversation about that,” he recalls. “Don’t underestimate what your customer might be looking for. Take the chance. Make that suggestion.”

 

Whether your small business sells plumbing supplies or time management software, there are a number of ways to start the conversation:

 

  • “Mention what the customer has bought in the past, especially if there is a direct tie between the original product and what you are now offering,” Friesen says. “Also thank your customer for his/her past business. Thank you is a great way to start a letter.”
  • Bundle different items into one package (think McDonald’s Super-sizing) and offer it at a price that is lower than the combined price if purchased separately but more than if the customer just bought one item.

 

  • Use expert recommendations to influence behavior and drive sales. Amazon uses this method extensively, which is one reason their revenues surged over $10 billion in 2011.
  • Set up an auto-responder program or pop-up window on your website that automatically offers cross-selling and upselling opportunities.