Tag Archive: copywriter

8 Keys In Getting Your Prospects To Act

8 Keys In Getting Your Prospects To Act

Today I would like to look at the matter of persuasion. How do you get your prospects to take action?

I remember as a door-to-door salesman, my instructor often said that you must understand ‘why people buy’. It has a certain ring to it doesn’t it? If you know why people buy then you can gear your ads towards these ‘psychological buttons’.

Before I go any further, I would just like to mention that this is in no way ‘manipulation’. It’s just common sense that you don’t approach someone about an important decision when they’re angry. Every wise wife knows how to place their husband in that ‘mood’ before they spring their special request on him!

Even kids wait until their parents are in a good mood before they tell them the cost of the special outfit that they MUST have.

Having cleared the air let’s look at these important principles.

1. Scarcity – People go after those opportunities or products that are limited in availability. That’s why you must show in your ad that your offer is for a limited time or in limited quantities. Field tests have shown that limited-quantity ads pull much better than limited-time ads. Procrastination is still a large part of human nature, so there’re always those who would wait until the last minute to act. If the prospect knows that the item is in limited quantity, there’s no way of determining when they’d be all sold out.

2. Herding Instinct – Your prospects will better respond to your ad if you can show that people JUST LIKE them are responding. Just recently a high school senior knocked on my door selling magazine subscription for a college scholarship program. She used that number on me – she was sure to let me know that my neighbors had bought subscriptions! We all just want to keep up with our neighbors. Needless to say, I fell for it. Whether I would read the magazine is another story.

I often point this out to my wife and you can try looking for this pattern as well. You would seldom find a satellite dish on a single home on a block. You often find dish receivers in pairs or more. One neighbor gets that service and the other follows. The same goes for gardens and lawns. Nobody wants to be the sore thumb! This is where the use of testimonials comes in. Your testimonials say “See, a lot of people like you are making this decision”. Use lots of testimonials.

3. The desire to pay back a good deed – If someone thinks that you’ve given him or her something of value then there is a strong desire to pay you back the favor. One example is that of AOL that marketed their service by giving away those floppy disks. They literally blanketed the USA with these floppy disks. They still do but now with CDs and 1000 hrs free etc. Do you think that this is working for AOL?

In your marketing efforts you must give something of value FIRST – this builds loyalty and results. Always show the value of what your ‘free’ service is – never just say ‘FREE’. Show the value of the gift then say that it is free. This is important because you want the person to place value on your bonus. (You’ll notice that in all the bonus ebooks that I’ve given through these articles that I first tell you the value of them -and even go out of my way to prove the value sometimes.)

4. Authority – People will listen to you if they see that you have authority on your subject. There was a TV commercial that used this line – “My son-in-law recommended that I take _____ for my heartburn. Why should I listen to him you say? He’s a doctor”. You may think that you do not have authority on what you are advertising. In this case appeal to authority figures – quote from a respected journal, expert … you get the idea.

5. Commitment – If someone has made a PUBLIC commitment to something then they are more likely to follow through. Find some way of getting someone to make a commitment and he or she’s more likely to follow through than if they did not. That’s why any motivational trainer would tell you that it’s important to WRITE your goals down -you are more likely to complete them!

Just today I received a sales letter in the mail for which I had to send for free information. My physical act of commitment was to peel a nice red label marked “free” and place it in a designated spot on the mail back card. Now you know why they make you do this little silly stuff.

Only if weddings worked the same way!

6. Your ‘likability’ – People would respond to your offer if they like you. It’s hard to sell to someone to whom you have no relationship even if it’s just a ‘perceived’ relationship. This is one of the most overlooked areas of marketing on the Internet.

The Internet can seem a little cold sometimes. I’ve found that even after making email contact with my prospect I still have to make voice contact before they sign up for my offers. At the same time the Internet is a wonderful tool to build relationships through emails, message boards, instant messages … the list goes on. It’s a known fact that someone would buy from you if THEY think that YOU like them. Give people value, more than they expect and you have a customer for life!

7. The eternal “what’s in it for me?” principle – As your prospect read your ad this is the question they are seeking an answer to. Make sure that you give them plenty of answers. Appeal to their desire for recognition, wealth, better health, and security -yes all those nice things on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs – all the way up to self-actualization. (Check out a Psychology 101 text book if you are not familiar with Maslow -you will glad you did.) But do not forget to appeal to their FEAR of pain and loss.

8. Simply just ask for their business.

Field research has shown that people are more responsive to loss than gain. Be sure to show them what they would LOSE if they don’t get your product.

Read through your sales letters again and see if these buttons

 

Branding and Naming Your Product: Here Are Some Tips

Branding and Naming Your Product: Here Are Some Tips

Product naming is a key aspect of branding. The name you ultimately choose will reflect who you are, your company’s personality and vision. But more importantly, it must unforgettably embody the promise of your product’s main benefit to your potential customers. It can dovetail generically with your competition, but ideally, it should stand out from the crowd. Where to begin? Here are some basic guidelines.

If the field’s too crowded, be unique

MSN Search, Netscape Search, AOL Search, they all stayed in the same category, so you could play it safe and go with Stupendous Search or Super-Duper Search. This works for a time, but as soon as the field gets too crowded, you’ll be lost in the mush of sameness with ever diminishing name recognition. If you’re in it for the long haul, better to break away from the crowd with a name like Google, Yahoo, or even Dogpile (though I’m not a fan of going into the scat category just to be unique). Even Kinkos—the founder’s nickname (he had kinky red hair in school)—is different enough to be memorable.

Avoid tongue twisters

There’s a little part in all of us that hates to be embarrassed. When we ask for a product or talk about it with friends, we want to sound literate and not fumble over pronunciations. So be kind to your potential customers and avoid tongue twisters, or any name that’s unusually long or foreign sounding. If you can’t find a single-word name, don’t go over two or three syllables.

Alliteration can help with longer names

Okay, so the president of the company likes all the longer names on your list. You can make them more memorable and/or easier to pronounce by using alliteration. Consider Circuit City (originally, the incredibly bland, monosyllabic, Wards). Or Downtown Disney, Or the most famous brand in the world, Coca Cola. All four syllables, yet they roll off the tongue with surprising ease.

Avoid abbreviations

Abbreviations lack personality and communicate very little in terms of benefit or brand character. Sure, IBM, MCI and ABC have big recognition and identity, but they also spent years and millions in virtually all media to promote their image—using images of people and situations that were warm and fuzzy. Even billionaire Bill Gates chose Microsoft over MS (which has some undesirable connotations).

Convey an implied benefit

If you don’t have a lot of media dollars to spend on name recognition, try for a name that conveys a benefit or describes content. Snapple started out with a name that combined two of its original flavors: Spice N Apple. Silk—the soy-based milk brand—combines soy and milk. Benefit-oriented names include EasyOff oven cleaner, Miracle-Grow plant food, and Hearthwarmer (a fireplace insert).

Lost in Translation…or worse!

Most of us have heard the story of Chevrolet introducing their “Nova” in Spanish-speaking countries. The car tanked because ‘nova’ means “doesn’t go.” Fiat found they had to rename their “uno” in Finland, since “Uno” means garbage in Finnish. Canadian products require labeling in both English and French, which is why on some cookie boxes, the English phrase “without preservatives” has been unintentionally translated into the French “sans preservatives,” which means “without condoms.” ‘Nuff said.

Shun fads

The shelf life of a faddish name is short and sweet. It rises to the stratosphere of recognition then nosedives into obscurity faster than you can say, “radical,” “tubular” or “outta sight.” Another problem with fads is they’re often limited to one demographic or clique. In a market as broad and diverse as the U.S., it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Protect your image

If you’re like most companies, you worked hard and spent some real money creating the image of your company. So it only makes sense to protect your investment with a product name that’s consistent with your existing brands and image. Rolls Royce had to pull the name of its newest addition to the Silver Cloud line, which they tentatively named the “Silver Mist,” since in German, “mist” means manure. So build on what you have. A good example: Google’s entry into online shopping with Froogle. Incidentally, if you’re wondering where “Google” came from, it’s a variation on the math term googol, a huge number with endless zeros.

Don’t forget legal

Once you’ve settled on a few ideal prospective names, hire a good lawyer to make sure they’re not already being used and not confusingly similar to someone else’s in your industry.

Hopefully, this brief overview will help guide you through the subtleties of product naming. Remember, try to be unique and benefit oriented without being confusing or offensive. Avoid fads, abbreviations and tongue twisters. And, by all means, protect your image.

Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion TechniquesGetting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques. Today I would like to look at the matter of persuasion. How do you get your prospects to take action?

I remember as a door-to-door salesman, my instructor often said that you must understand ‘why people buy’. It has a certain ring to it doesn’t it? If you know why people buy then you can gear your ads towards these ‘psychological buttons’. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

Before I go any further, I would just like to mention that this is in no way ‘manipulation’. It’s just common sense that you don’t approach someone about an important decision when they’re angry. Every wise wife knows how to place their husband in that ‘mood’ before they spring their special request on him!  Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

Even kids wait until their parents are in a good mood before they tell them the cost of the special outfit that they MUST have.

Having cleared the air let’s look at these important principles.

1. Scarcity – People go after those opportunities or products that are limited in availability. That’s why you must show in your ad that your offer is for a limited time or in limited quantities. Field tests have shown that limited-quantity ads pull much better than limited-time ads. Procrastination is still a large part of human nature, so there’re always those who would wait until the last minute to act. If the prospect knows that the item is in limited quantity, there’s no way of determining when they’d be all sold out. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

2. Herding Instinct – Your prospects will better respond to your ad if you can show that people JUST LIKE them are responding. Just recently a high school senior knocked on my door selling magazine subscription for a college scholarship program. She used that number on me – she was sure to let me know that my neighbors had bought subscriptions! We all just want to keep up with our neighbors. Needless to say, I fell for it. Whether I would read the magazine is another story. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

I often point this out to my wife and you can try looking for this pattern as well. You would seldom find a satellite dish on a single home on a block. You often find dish receivers in pairs or more. One neighbor gets that service and the other follows. The same goes for gardens and lawns. Nobody wants to be the sore thumb! This is where the use of testimonials comes in. Your testimonials say “See, a lot of people like you are making this decision”. Use lots of testimonials. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

3. The desire to pay back a good deed – If someone thinks that you’ve given him or her something of value then there is a strong desire to pay you back the favor. One example is that of AOL that marketed their service by giving away those floppy disks. They literally blanketed the USA with these floppy disks. They still do but now with CDs and 1000 hrs free etc. Do you think that this is working for AOL?

In your marketing efforts you must give something of value FIRST – this builds loyalty and results. Always show the value of what your ‘free’ service is – never just say ‘FREE’. Show the value of the gift then say that it is free. This is important because you want the person to place value on your bonus. (You’ll notice that in all the bonus ebooks that I’ve given through these articles that I first tell you the value of them -and even go out of my way to prove the value sometimes.)

4. Authority – People will listen to you if they see that you have authority on your subject. There was a TV commercial that used this line – “My son-in-law recommended that I take _____ for my heartburn. Why should I listen to him you say? He’s a doctor”. You may think that you do not have authority on what you are advertising. In this case appeal to authority figures – quote from a respected journal, expert … you get the idea. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

5. Commitment – If someone has made a PUBLIC commitment to something then they are more likely to follow through. Find some way of getting someone to make a commitment and he or she’s more likely to follow through than if they did not. That’s why any motivational trainer would tell you that it’s important to WRITE your goals down -you are more likely to complete them!

Just today I received a sales letter in the mail for which I had to send for free information. My physical act of commitment was to peel a nice red label marked “free” and place it in a designated spot on the mail back card. Now you know why they make you do this little silly stuff.

Only if weddings worked the same way!

6. Your ‘likability’ – People would respond to your offer if they like you. It’s hard to sell to someone to whom you have no relationship even if it’s just a ‘perceived’ relationship. This is one of the most overlooked areas of marketing on the Internet. Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques

The Internet can seem a little cold sometimes. I’ve found that even after making email contact with my prospect I still have to make voice contact before they sign up for my offers. At the same time the Internet is a wonderful tool to build relationships through emails, message boards, instant messages … the list goes on. It’s a known fact that someone would buy from you if THEY think that YOU like them. Give people value, more than they expect and you have a customer for life!

7. The eternal “what’s in it for me?” principle – As your prospect read your ad this is the question they are seeking an answer to. Make sure that you give them plenty of answers. Appeal to their desire for recognition, wealth, better health, and security -yes all those nice things on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs – all the way up to self-actualization. (Check out a Psychology 101 text book if you are not familiar with Maslow -you will glad you did.) But do not forget to appeal to their FEAR of pain and loss.

Field research has shown that people are more responsive to loss than gain. Be sure to show them what they would LOSE if they don’t get your product.

Read through your sales letters again and see if these buttons Getting Your Prospects To Act: 7 Key Persuasion Techniques