Tag Archive: productivity

How To Improve The Management of Your Business

How To Improve The Management of Your Business
All companies have business processes that can be improved. Most companies can benefit from automation or further automation of solutions.

Improving Management of Your Business

Improving business processes is all about a work flow plan, often graphic, and implementation of automating and organizing work processes. It is also a way of defining software architectures and applications. Business process solutions help an enterprise monitor human and automated processes. It can also serve as an enterprise application integration (EAI) tool. Business process management solutions help you identify areas of your business that can be automated and used to apply business rules and guidelines. In practical terms, it acts like a virtual machine that executes process models rather than software code.

Business process solutions take business data and determine how the information is used to perform a task. By creating an overview, a business manager can plan and improve an existing business process. Some solutions also send data through a test set of tasks to ensure that a business process is being followed. These solutions permit a business manager to visually describe, control and trail the flow of a work process. Process solutions generally involve computer systems and software to automate a process.

Technologies used to implement process management solutions include work flow charts, BP-XML languages, ERP (Enterprise Resource Management), software development and EAI (Enterprise Application Integration). ERP is a set of applications that can cover financials, manufacturing, human resources and back-office business administration utilities of an enterprise. It is a business management system that integrates all components of the business as well as planning. On the other hand, EAI software operates as a center that interprets data and messages between different applications.

Improving and automating business processes is the path to gaining huge productivity. These management solutions monitor business presentation by defining a series of tasks that must be performed to attain a defined strategic goal. There are three obligatory requirements – flexibility, reliability and security.

A good solution must help in continuous process enhancement, but managing the huge amount of these processes becomes more and more difficult as organizations become highly complex. Process management solutions give you the capability to satisfy and retain your customers and also maximize your joint venture returns with other businesses.

Remember that business processes define your business, and they can also present your organization with a competitive benefit. If you can make your processes efficient, you will reap better customer relations and profits.

Time Management Tips for Small Business Owners

Time Management Tips for Small Business Owners

Few would argue that being a small business owner can be enormously demanding. Whether it’s dealing with vendors, managing staff, or serving customers, finding the right balance for these tasks can be a formidable challenge. While some try to handle the time management dilemma by working overtime every day, this kind of solution can often lead to burnout. How then can business owners successfully manage their time without sacrificing their health and personal lives?

Following are time management tips from several small business owners who have faced this challenge:

1. Don’t be afraid of shutting down technology to complete a project.

Because technology allows us to instantaneously access information via an unending assortment of mobile or wireless devices, it can be tempting to constantly check for e-mails or alerts—and then just as quickly respond to them. Try to avoid this trap. Unless you are waiting for a time-sensitive response from a client, your time is probably better spent attending to other aspects of your business.

Diana Ennen, president of Virtual Word Publishing, an online PR/marketing firm that handles book authors, wholeheartedly agrees.

“You absolutely need to focus and turn off all notifications when working on projects,” she urges. “That means turn off your cell phone, social media, Skype, or e-mail notifications. Log out of Outlook so that way you won’t see new e-mails coming in. If it helps, set a timer and work for several hours.”

To prove her point, Ennen, who works with four subcontractors regularly, says she often does this when writing press releases and articles for clients. As a result, she can complete the job easily. “It’s so much better because I’ve committed to it and am fully focused,” she says.

2. Carve out a block of time to complete jobs.

If you want to use your time productively, schedule in your calendar a block of time to work on a key job or project. This way you will be able to concentrate on what needs to be done without scattering your energies or letting your attention wander to a host of other things.

Time_Management_PQ.jpg

Dana Manciagli, a Bellevue, Washington-based career consultant with her own business, says this is an imperative.

“Schedule your important work as an appointment to yourself,” advises Manciagli, who previously worked at Microsoft as a worldwide sales manager. “If you need to write proposals that you are not getting to, open your calendar and make an appointment with yourself for it. If you need to remind yourself which ones to work on, put more details in the body of the invitation.”

3. Master the art of saying no.

Cultivating potential customers and associates at meetings or networking events is good for business. But if your attendance prevents you from planning your monthly budget or training new personnel, you might have to decline the invitation to focus on the task on hand. Be strategic when weighing the pros and cons of invitations as well as favors that others may ask of you.

“Learn how to say no,” insists Manciagli. “I made a lot of mistakes in my first year [as a small business professional] and this is one of them. Ask yourself: Which line item of my P&L will benefit immediately if I attend this event? Cost-Savings? And within revenue, be more specific with yourself. Will new clients be there? Will I get leads? If not, say ‘no, thank you.’”

4. Get up early.

It might be a platitude but the old saying, “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man, healthy, wealthy and wise,” might have some validity for business owners seeking to better manage their time. Drew Stevens, owner of Stevens Consulting Group, which helps small struggling healthcare professionals improve their revenue, endorses this takeaway as a great way to get things done.

With the extra time, Stevens says small business owners can review a perplexing client issue or look over notes or PowerPoint slides for an upcoming board meeting. “I remember getting up at 5 a.m. to get my master’s work done before I commuted to work,” he says. “And if you do commute, do some work on the train rather than read a book or sleep.”

5. Create a to-do list.

Sometimes scheduling time to complete a project is not enough. You might need to actually write out a to-do list on a regular basis. Then once you’re finished with each task, just cross it off until you get to the next job. It might sound like an obvious time management solution for small business owners, but not too many do it, says Essen. However, if you don’t adhere to this simple best practice, you might be subjecting yourself to a lot of all-nighters.

“To feel more in control, make this a habit—even on your busiest days,” she advises. “It takes away the feeling of being overwhelmed and the fear of forgetting something. For me, it has been instrumental as well in completing larger projects, such as redoing my website. It’s amazing how freeing it is to take large projects a chunk at a time. And if they don t get done, put it on the list for tomorrow.”

6. Learn to delegate.

As a small business owner, it is not incumbent upon you to do everything yourself. Lighten your load by learning to assign some duties to your staff or others who can help you.

Says Stevens: “There is no reason to be involved in everything. For example, I operate a very busy coaching business and recognize I cannot do it all. To that end, I hire freelancers for my graphics, my invoicing, my collections and even printing. This allows me to focus on my most vital aspect—clients.”

Small Business Owners Management Tips

Small Business Owners Management Tips

Small Business Owners Management Tips

Small Business Owners Management Tips

By Iris Dorbian.

Few would argue that being a small business owner can be enormously demanding. Whether it’s dealing with vendors, managing staff, or serving customers, finding the right balance for these tasks can be a formidable challenge. While some try to handle the time management dilemma by working overtime every day, this kind of solution can often lead to burnout. How then can business owners successfully manage their time without sacrificing their health and personal lives?

Following are time management tips from several small business owners who have faced this challenge:

1. Don’t be afraid of shutting down technology to complete a project.

Because technology allows us to instantaneously access information via an unending assortment of mobile or wireless devices, it can be tempting to constantly check for e-mails or alerts—and then just as quickly respond to them. Try to avoid this trap. Unless you are waiting for a time-sensitive response from a client, your time is probably better spent attending to other aspects of your business.

Diana Ennen, president of Virtual Word Publishing, an online PR/marketing firm that handles book authors, wholeheartedly agrees.

“You absolutely need to focus and turn off all notifications when working on projects,” she urges. “That means turn off your cell phone, social media, Skype, or e-mail notifications. Log out of Outlook so that way you won’t see new e-mails coming in. If it helps, set a timer and work for several hours.”

To prove her point, Ennen, who works with four subcontractors regularly, says she often does this when writing press releases and articles for clients. As a result, she can complete the job easily. “It’s so much better because I’ve committed to it and am fully focused,” she says.

2. Carve out a block of time to complete jobs.

If you want to use your time productively, schedule in your calendar a block of time to work on a key job or project. This way you will be able to concentrate on what needs to be done without scattering your energies or letting your attention wander to a host of other things.

Dana Manciagli, a Bellevue, Washington-based career consultant with her own business, says this is an imperative.

“Schedule your important work as an appointment to yourself,” advises Manciagli, who previously worked at Microsoft as a worldwide sales manager. “If you need to write proposals that you are not getting to, open your calendar and make an appointment with yourself for it. If you need to remind yourself which ones to work on, put more details in the body of the invitation.”

3. Master the art of saying no.

Cultivating potential customers and associates at meetings or networking events is good for business. But if your attendance prevents you from planning your monthly budget or training new personnel, you might have to decline the invitation to focus on the task on hand. Be strategic when weighing the pros and cons of invitations as well as favors that others may ask of you.

“Learn how to say no,” insists Manciagli. “I made a lot of mistakes in my first year [as a small business professional] and this is one of them. Ask yourself: Which line item of my P&L will benefit immediately if I attend this event? Cost-Savings? And within revenue, be more specific with yourself. Will new clients be there? Will I get leads? If not, say ‘no, thank you.’”

4. Get up early.

It might be a platitude but the old saying, “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man, healthy, wealthy and wise,” might have some validity for business owners seeking to better manage their time. Drew Stevens, owner of Stevens Consulting Group, which helps small struggling healthcare professionals improve their revenue, endorses this takeaway as a great way to get things done.

With the extra time, Stevens says small business owners can review a perplexing client issue or look over notes or PowerPoint slides for an upcoming board meeting. “I remember getting up at 5 a.m. to get my master’s work done before I commuted to work,” he says. “And if you do commute, do some work on the train rather than read a book or sleep.”

5. Create a to-do list.

Sometimes scheduling time to complete a project is not enough. You might need to actually write out a to-do list on a regular basis. Then once you’re finished with each task, just cross it off until you get to the next job. It might sound like an obvious time management solution for small business owners, but not too many do it, says Essen. However, if you don’t adhere to this simple best practice, you might be subjecting yourself to a lot of all-nighters.

“To feel more in control, make this a habit—even on your busiest days,” she advises. “It takes away the feeling of being overwhelmed and the fear of forgetting something. For me, it has been instrumental as well in completing larger projects, such as redoing my website. It’s amazing how freeing it is to take large projects a chunk at a time. And if they don t get done, put it on the list for tomorrow.”

6. Learn to delegate.

As a small business owner, it is not incumbent upon you to do everything yourself. Lighten your load by learning to assign some duties to your staff or others who can help you.

Says Stevens: “There is no reason to be involved in everything. For example, I operate a very busy coaching business and recognize I cannot do it all. To that end, I hire freelancers for my graphics, my invoicing, my collections and even printing. This allows me to focus on my most vital aspect—clients.”

Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer

Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer.Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer

Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer. One summer, I interned at a law firm in San Francisco. I wanted to impress the partners so that they would offer me a job after I graduated the following year. This was back in the day when law firms really wined-and-dined their potential associates.

 

Man, I loved that summer.

 

The partners took us river rafting, invited us to fancy dinners and drinks at their homes, and yes, they even took us in a hot-air balloon. Oh yeah, we also did a little work too. Needless to say, I really wanted to work at that firm. Well, I got my chance a year later, and let’s just say that the real world was a tad different than my summer of fun. Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer.

 

It turns out that many businesses are learning that one of the smartest things they can do, especially at this time of year, is to take advantage of the natural rhythms of the season and give employees their own summer fun. Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer.

 

In fact, if you take a close look at the latest edition of the spring 2013 Bank of America Small Business Owner Report (SBOR), it turns out that many employers are taking this idea of creating a strong culture seriously. The Report found that almost nine in 10 small business owners offer some type of benefits to their employees.

If you want to engage your employees this summer, here are a few tips mentioned in the SBOR that will make your employees feel more engaged:

 

1. Offer flexible work hours: Forty-five percent of the entrepreneurs surveyed in the SBOR said that they reward their staff with flexible hours and/or they let them work from home. While this used to be an exotic idea, it is much more commonplace today. Between the cloud, smart phones, apps and laptops, anyone can work anywhere at any time. Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer.

 

So let them.

 

Especially during the summer, it makes sense to give employees some flexibility and some time to enjoy the nice weather.  By allowing your employees to get work done at a time more convenient for them, they will reward you with their loyalty and hard work.

 

2. Share amenities like free lunch, massages, etc. When you visit a large, successful Internet company like Google or Facebook, one thing that is very noticeable is the amount of free (or subsidized) food available. No, it’s not cheap, but it is a benefit that keeps people at the office and not taking two-hour lunches.

 

For small businesses, one alternative might be to provide free, healthy snacks like fruit and water, which are affordable and appreciated.

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3. Lead team building events:  According to the SBOR, only about 25 percent of the small business owners surveyed used this tactic, and I think that is a mistake. In the summertime, when everyone is thinking about a lot more than just work, a fun event together away from the office is often just what the doctor ordered. Whether it is going out to dinner, a game, or a concert together, a team-building event is the best way to grow as a team and build a strong culture.

 

4. Allow social media at work: This is a tricky one. Twenty-four percent of those surveyed said they use this tactic to reward employees. However, as we all know, social media can easily gobble up a whole lot more time than one anticipates and potentially decrease productivity in the office. I recommend offering this perk to employees as it is a great way to take a short mental break from work, but certainly speak up if you feel the privilege is being abused.

 

5. Give unexpected freebies: Give employees some free time off. Have a spontaneous contest and give the winner a pair of seats to a game. Buy gift cards from Starbucks and hand them out. Give everyone an unannounced afternoon off.

 

This is the time of year when people like to take advantage of the outdoors. Let them and you and your business will both be rewarded. Ways to Engage Your Employees This Summer.

 

Debt of Gratitude: The importance and value of thanking your employees

Debt of Gratitude: The importance and value of thanking your employees
by Erin McDermott.

Why was there no one to answer the phones at Windsor Resources the other day? Instead of a proverbial “Gone Fishin’” sign up on the front door, it would have been more apt had it said, “Tennis, anyone?”

More like tennis everyone: All 30 employees of the New York and Stamford, Connecticut, staffing and recruiting firm spent the day in Flushing Meadows at the National Tennis Center, checking out the action at the U.S. Open. It was a measure of thanks from Windsor chief executive and founder John Schapiro to his staffers, who he says have stuck by him through the ups and downs of running a small business.

“Everyone’s given their all to make this opportunity for me and I want to give back,” Schapiro says. “I think everyone works with me and not for me. When you have a staff that shows such ethics, loyalty, and appreciation, you want to do something nice for them.”

With Labor Day having just passed by on the calendar, it’s time to reflect on a holiday that pays homage to Americans’ work ethic and honors the effort that built this country and its giant economy.

It can also prompt small business owners to think about how they can show gratitude to their employees. While times have been tough at many companies recently, it’s still important to remember the long-term value of having employees who feel appreciated. “The costs associated with thanking our employees are minimal compared to the costs we incur when we have to replace them,” notes David Handmaker, president of Next Day Flyers, a Rancho Dominguez, California-based online printing company. “Letting employees know they are valued is a message which should be continually conveyed.”

So how can you give back without breaking the bank, while still giving employees something of genuine value?

Start by thinking of what you can afford, says Jerry Ross, a longtime entrepreneur and now executive director of the National Entrepreneurial Center, a small business development group in Orlando, Florida. “A raise of a dollar an hour is nice, but after the first paycheck it may not mean much to them. It’s something that will cost you every week after that.”

Ross recalls taking his teams on brewery tours, go-kart racing outings, and pizza and beer nights—all focusing on building camaraderie, boosting morale, and making for fun memories. Over the years, he’d negotiate with clients to build up a stockpile of freebies and gift certificates, which he’d in turn offer to staffers deserving of a thank you. “People don’t usually leave companies because of money,” he says. “They leave because they have bad bosses.”

But what works? A few ideas from other small business people:

Know your staff. Make it a general practice to chat throughout the year, to learn the names of significant others, kids, grandchildren, pets, activities, and challenges, too—the things that matter most to them. A small donation to a favorite charity or even a Bring Your Pet to Work Day will be long remembered.

Blow off steam together. When significant goals or deadlines are reached, why not recognize hard work with a bit of a blowout? When employees can bond on other levels it can be good for your business, too. Shawn Farner, a web communications and marketing specialist in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, says he fondly remembers his time in the insurance industry, when his company would pick up the tab for a quarterly day out with co-workers. “A bean counter might see that as a day of lost productivity and a couple of hundred dollars the company didn’t need to spend, but I saw it as a great way to show appreciation,” says Farner. “A bonus is nice, but a good time is even better.”

Don’t forget significant others. If your staffers are putting in long hours, it’s likely affecting their personal lives, too. So aim your special rewards at not only your employees, but their loved ones, too. “I believe people appreciate stuff that’s done for people they love even more than stuff that’s done for them,” says Tolulope Akinola, founder of AppHere, a five-person app development company in Palo Alto, California. As someone running a startup on a tight budget, he says he still does his best to find opportunities to show his appreciation, such as gifts of dinner for two at a nice restaurant or spa gift certificates to spouses or partners who deal with his employees’ longer-than-usual absences.

Low-cost rewards don’t have to feel cheap. Consider a monthly drawing with inexpensive prizes, like a later start on a Friday or a Starbucks card. Celebrate an employee of the month and let the staff make the decision. A tower of cupcakes to celebrate when an employee passes a certification exam or achieves a periodic safety record is also a good idea. While financial incentives are always welcome by employees, smaller tokens of appreciation often have a more lasting effect in showing employees their hard work is not going unnoticed.

For more information on this article, go to http://smallbusinessonlinecommunity.bankofamerica.com/community/growing-your-business/employeebenefitsandretirementplanning/blog/2012/09/06/debt-of-gratitude-the-importance-and-value-of-thanking-your-employees

Does Your Small Business Need a Coach?

Does Your Small Business Need a Coach?
by Susan Caminiti.

Marsha Egan is no stranger to business coaches. She used one back in 2005 as she was planning to leave her job as a senior vice president with a Fortune 500 insurance company to strike out on her own. Now that she’s running her own business, Egan is once again using the services of a coach, but this time it’s to help take her company—InBoxDetox.com, a workplace productivity firm—to the next level of growth.

“My business is going okay, but it’s not where I want it to be given the time and effort I’m putting in,” says Egan, whose Nantucket, Massachusetts-based company works with leaders of small- to medium-sized firms. “A coach helps me understand what I can do differently to get better results. Basically, she’s helping me see what I’m not seeing.”

Providing that kind of guidance—or handholding, depending on the client—has become a big business. According to the 2012 Global Coaching study done by the International Coach Federation (ICF), the industry’s leading network and certification organization, and PriceWaterhouseCoopers, nearly 48,000 coaches worldwide are generating a staggering $2 billion a year in revenue.

Before trying to figure out whether a business coach can sharpen your leadership skills or help goose productivity, it helps to understand what coaching is and—perhaps more importantly—what it’s not. Coaching is not therapy. True, you will need to be extremely candid and honest with a coach about your management weaknesses and trouble spots (and yes, some of the very traits you’re trying to change may have roots in childhood). But unlike in therapy, there is no expert/subordinate dynamic that exists in business coaching, says Janet Harvey, president of the ICF and a coach herself. “The coach/client relationship is peer to peer,” she says.

Nor is coaching the same as consulting. For example, if you want someone to come in to implement a performance management system, call a human resources consultant. However, if you want to become more effective at motivating your employees, that’s where a coach can help, explains Harvey. “Coaching is all about working with the client to help them recognize their blind spots and then figure out ways to do what they’re doing better and more effectively,” she says.

PQ_BusinessCoach.jpgWhat to Look For

Choosing the right coach to work with is similar to establishing other business relationships: you want solid credentials, good references, and the feeling that the two of you fit well. Karyn Greenstreet, founder of Passion for Business, a small business coaching and consulting firm based in Reading, Pennsylvania, advises entrepreneurs to do their homework when selecting a coach. Among her tips for finding the right one:

Check that the coach is a member of the International Coach Federation
Select someone who has experience in coaching a business of your size. If you’re a one-person shop you don’t necessarily want someone who’s used to dealing with owners of companies with 100 or more employees.
The initial consultation is free. A good coach will make that offer so that the two of you can get to know each other and determine what you’re hoping to accomplish.
There’s a comfort level. Do you feel positive after speaking with this person, or dragged down? If you’re energetic and the coach is more low-key (or vice versa), are you okay with that? As Greenstreet points out, you will be spending a lot of time together.
Discuss the fees upfront. The cost of coaching varies widely and is determined by the experience of the coach and the length of the contract. Don’t be shy about asking the coach to break out his or her prices and be clear about what you’ll be getting for your money.

Finding the Right Arrangement

The methods and styles used in business coaching are rarely the same from client to client, says the ICF’s Harvey. Some entrepreneurs can handle a one-hour session every other week, and then want to be left alone to mull over the ideas, she says. Others prefer a more intensive two- to three-hour session once a month. The point is to figure out what you’re most comfortable with, and that the coach is flexible enough to change it at your request.

Working in person or over the phone is another area to clarify at the beginning. Julie Cohen, a coach specializing in work/life balance issues, has herself used a coach to help redefine her business as her own life changed. “What I’ve recognized from being a coach is that we typically can’t see our own blind spots in business,” she says.

Cohen, who started her company in 2000, says she operated with the belief that as a successful coach, she should cater to both individual and corporate clients. The work involved in servicing both areas was becoming overwhelming, she recalls. “I wasn’t sure what my business was and it was killing me,” she says. “Here it is that I’m talking to clients about work/life balance and I had none.”

After working with her business coach for a few weeks last year—all by phone—Cohen was able to finally admit that she really didn’t like working with individual clients and derived more satisfaction from her corporate clients. “Having a coach help me get to that realization was just so freeing for me,” she adds. Cohen promptly redesigned her website to emphasize her offerings to corporate clients and was able to dedicate more time to them.

Measuring Results

One of the often-heard criticisms of coaching is that it’s difficult to measure its value. Not so, says Marsha Egan. She advises being very clear from the beginning about why you’re hiring a coach (improve your company’s visibility, increase morale, be a better boss, for instance) and then look at the results at the end of the contract.

“I knew when I hired my coach that at the end of our time together I want a new tagline for my business, a new blog, and a redefinition of what I’m doing,” she says. After each one-hour phone session with her coach, Egan does a sort of homework assignment where she implements the new strategies she’s learned and then she and her coach discuss the results. “There’s no guess work here,” says Egan. “If I was happy with the way things were going with my business, I wouldn’t be using a coach. To me, this is an effective way to bring about changes that are going to make me a more productive and happier business owner.”

Top 12 Time Management and Organization Tips for Entrepreneurs

Many small businesses may not be devoting enough time or energy to develop a true organizational system. Often, getting organized is an afterthought, or something only addressed out of necessity after reaching a certain point of disorganized chaos.

A 2010 survey from the National Association of Professional Organizers (NAPO) and Office Depot shows that, although 82 percent of respondents thought a more organized workspace would improve productivity, 42 percent said they only cleaned up clutter once a month.

The consequences of chronic disorganization can range from lost time (something no small business owner has enough of) to missed deadlines or tardiness to key meetings. Conversely, the benefits of organization have the potential to make a positive impact: Having a handle on your physical space, documents, schedule and staff utilization can free your time so you can spend more time for with customers or or to develop plans to break into a new market.

To help get your company organized, consider the following tips:

Physical Space

Streamline your desk area so that only the items you use regularly are at hand. A cluttered desk may make you look busier, but constantly searching for documents can erode your productivity.
Clean off your desk at the end of each day. It will make it easier to get to substantive tasks the next morning.
Envision an office space that will keep you energized and work on moving toward that goal in incremental steps. If you want it done all at once, consider hiring a professional workspace planner.

Paperwork

Keep all official business documents (incorporation certificates; insurance policies; emergency plans) in one place and indexed for easy access.
If you are working toward a paperless office, avoid creating digital clutter by paying extra attention to file organization. Be organized when you first set up your network and shared files so that anyone can find the most current version of a document on your network.
Use the “one-touch rule” for reading e-mails and mail, i.e. either act on it, file it, or discard it. If you’re not sure what to do, file the document according to the business goal it facilitates.

multitasking.pngTime

Keep a master calendar for business and personal commitments, particularly if you have a small business that requires your attention during the day and evening hours. There are a number of free online tools that can help you manage your time, including Google Calendar and Yahoo! Calendar.
Minimize information overload by cancelling subscriptions to magazines and online newsletters that do not have a direct, positive impact on your business. You may feel instantly lighter.
When possible, tackle one task at a time. While it may seem like you’re accomplishing multiple tasks at once, “multitasking” has actually been shown to hinder productivity. A recent Stanford University study shows that while media multitasking in particular has become widespread, processing multiple streams of information and switching tasks frequently can overload your brain and jeopardize your productivity on all fronts.

Leadership

Delegate tasks and set deadlines in writing, not verbally.
Motivate employees to be more organized through your own example, but remember that people’s work styles vary.

You may also find that taking a few simple steps toward creating a more organized work life may help eliminate stress and other mental clutter that can stand in the way of your employee’s and your job satisfaction. What are your biggest organizational challenges? What tips and tools do you use?