Tag Archive: mentoring

Knowing Your Colors Can Allow You To Network Better

Knowing Your Colors Can Allow You To Network Better
There are 4 color personality types. Red, Blue, Green and Yellow.

In a nutshell knowing what the different color personalities people have means you’ll understand people better then they understand themselves.

At this point this tells you nothing. No worries it didn’t mean anything to me when I first heard about personality colors. But man I wish I knew about this years ago, it would have saved me a ton of aggravation.

Everybody has a color type. And with that color type we act in a certain way. Certain things are important to us. We like to be talked to in a certain way. We like and dislike certain things.

Take me for example. Lets say you were calling me as a potential prospect.

What if you knew how I liked to be talked to? Knew what was important to me. Knew what I didn’t like. Knew what I liked. Knew if I was over sensitive. Knew if I needed support. Knew if I like to have fun.

Knew if I would be teachable. Knew if I was money motivated. Knew if I would be a leader. Knew if I was creative. Knew if I needed all the facts and figures…. I could go on and on.

What if you knew all this information and soooooooo much more about me after only talking to me (anyone) for only a few minutes and then gained more and more insight to me the longer you talked to me?

Do you think this would impact your business and your personal life in a positive way?

If I have to answer that for you…honestly click away and go play a video game you’re just wasting your time. (Sorry about that I had some guy tell me he saw no value in this. Gee no wonder he’s not achieving all the success he could be.)

But for everyone else who sees the power of this. Would you not agree you’d have an unfair advantage on everyone else?

I can give you a brief overview of the four different personality colors. There is much more to learn but this will give you a good idea of the power of knowing color personalities. (They’re in no particular order)

First there is Yellow. Yellow’s make up 35% of the population and are open and indirect with their feelings. They are the best at using both sides of their brains. They are relationship and family orientated, logical, analytical and teamwork is very important to them. Their voice is soft and gentle and speak in relaxed tones.

Yellows have jobs like teachers, social workers usually any nurturing job. They like giving back to others. They don’t like pushy people, aggressiveness, sudden change or animal cruelty.

Some of their weaknesses are. They are over sensitive, take things personally and will buy other peoples excuses.

Talk to a yellow slowly and relaxed and let them know they are appreciated.

Next is Blue (that’s me). Blues make up 15% of the population. Blues are open and direct with their feelings. Very right brained, talk fast, very creative, must have fun doing things. Strong on family and relationships, spontaneous and enthusiastic.

Blues have jobs like sales (of any kind), singer songwriter anything that is creative.

They don’t like not having fun they don’t like facts and figures or being sold.

Their weaknesses are being unorganized, scattered and poor savers.

When you talk to a blue focus on fun, talk about excitement. Never try to sell a blue.

Next is Greens. Greens make up 35% of the population. They are indirect and self-contained with their feelings. Right brained, very logical, and analytical. Precise and need to have all the facts and figures. They are savers. Organized, task orientated and accurate. Let’s get the kids to college. And they’re the best negotiators.

Some of their jobs include, engineers, accountants, CPA, professor. Anything to do with logic and reasoning.

They don’t like pushy people. Not having all the facts and figures. Not being on time, aggressiveness. Get depressed easily and are hard to please.

Some of their weaknesses are, they over analyze everything (to death). Hard to please and pessimistic about everything.

When speaking to a green, give them the facts and figures. You cannot overload a green with information.

And finally the Reds. Reds make up 15% of the population. Reds are direct and self-contained with their feelings. Reds are right brained. Their slogan is “It’s my way or the highway” Forceful, stern and to the point. No chitchat, money is power, take action. Task orientated, Impatient, un-teachable, show me the money.

Their jobs consist of being CEO’s, Attorneys, military leaders, and president of the bank.

Reds do not like losing control, indecision, small talk or crying. They don’t like talking about time freedom, family or vacations.

Some of their weaknesses are having a big ego, domineering and un-teachable.

When you talk to a red you need to let them think you need them. They like being sold, close them, focus on money, and stroke their ego. Talk about your leaders income.

Now everything I just outlined about the different color personalities is not a judgment it’s who people are.

Just imagine if you had this information the next time you talked to a prospect? How do you think your next call would go?

Learn this skill so the next time you’re talking to someone and they say something in a certain tone or way or ask you a question. You’ll know exactly why they’re acting the way they are and why they are asking the questions they do.

Instead of taking things personally or getting frustrated, you’ll say to yourself “Hey you’re suppose to act like that or say that because you’re a green” (pick a color)

Master this one skill and your business life and personal life will skyrocket. Guaranteed!!!

 

What are The Successful Great M’s

What are The Successful Great M’s

People who have studied successful people over the last 300 or more years have found certain traits that accounted to their achievements.

These success techniques not only helped them forward but also kept them there even in times of depression, recession or other personal disasters.

Four of them are The Great M’s of Success in business and life.
<b>Mentoring, Masterminding, Marketing & Motivation</b>

I have heard it repeated over and over again, “Get Yourself a Mentor.”  Get help, advice and guidance by someone who has already been there and made it. A mentor can save you years to a lifetime of mistakes.  They can excel you forward, in ways you never could on your own. You’ll have a much greater ability to achieve your goals because you will have a blueprint to guide your way.

Surprisingly, many people if not most will go to a friend or relative for advice. People who have never succeeded and have no ambition to go anywhere, and then these same people are surprised when they too don’t succeed or even get very far. Then they look for excuses and reasons outside them selves for the failures. Such as recession, location, or even competition muscling in.

Accomplished people also belonged to a <b>Mastermind group.</b> They are people like you, entrepreneurs working towards a better life.

The collective power of the group brings increased knowledge that can help you resolve challenges that you may have. They also keep you motivated and accountable. The power or synergy of the mastermind group has shown over and over its ability to help people overcome any problems.

Each week, each person in the group would state what they have accomplished, what they are doing next and ask for assistance with any matters.  The group as a whole then works together to come up with solutions.  Discover just how powerful this is in moving you forward and achieving your desires. It also gives you the very important ability to give back to the group by helping them.

A small sample of people in or were in masterminds are: Henry Ford,  Firestone, Napoleon Hill, Andrew Carnegie, Anthony Robins, Mark Victor Hansen, Jack Canfield, Joe Vitale, Joel Christopher and so many more.

The third M is <b>Marketing.</b> No matter what your business is, if you don’t market yourself or business, you won’t get very far. You can’t expect to hide under a blanket in the corner and hope that someone finds you.

Marketing is more than just advertising. It’s understanding your target market and knowing how to promote to them and the benefits that your product or service will provide them.  Without this knowledge, you will either not attract anyone to you or you can waste a lot of money with zero results.

It pays to find people who understand this and can help guide you.  They can help you define your niche’, explain copywriting and the magic of words. They can show you the difference between features and benefits and why they are so important. And they can teach you how to test everything for positive and increased results.

Finally, the fourth is motivation. Motivation is the juice that keeps you going, that allows ideas to progress and persevere when times are tuff.  No matter how great your product or service is, if you don’t stay motivated, you probably won’t last through the hard times.

There are many ways to help you stay motivated. One is to be around others that are also moving forward. A second is to write down and post right in front of you, Why You Are Doing This. Get specific and detailed as possible. Then post it in front of your computer or where ever you work the most.  Look at it often to remind your self why and what your motivation soar.

Grasp on the marvelous Ms and jumpstart your own goals dreams and desires.

Seven Ways to Find the Right Mentor

Whether you’re a start-up or you have been in business for a while, chances are issues will arise that you have not encountered before. You may be looking to hire a strategic partner for the first time; you may be interested in launching a social networking campaign; or you may be seeking to expand your business by tapping into a new market.

Instead of taking extensive time to research these issues on your own (or opting to plow ahead and hope for the best), you might want to consider forming a relationship with a business mentor. Sometimes the process of finding a mentor happens naturally, (i.e. someone you know socially turns out to be an expert on the business issue you’re facing). Most of the time, however, it takes a concerted effort.

The following are seven tips small business owners should remember when looking for a business mentor.

1. Narrow down the list of issues with which you need help. Prioritize your most pressing challenges so you can get the most out of a mentor relationship. You may even determine you need more than one mentor. Asking for too much information at once can overwhelm even the most generous person.

2. Pinpoint the personal qualities you think you’d respond to in a mentor. Before refining your list of potential mentors, do some soul searching and see if you can answer questions like these:

Are you interested in someone who is a good listener and doesn’t offer feedback until he or she mulls over your question?
Do you prefer people who tell you everything they know on a subject?
Is responsiveness important to you – do you want hands-on guidance in real time?
Would you prefer verbal feedback on your planned courses of action?

3. Define the parameters of the relationship. The ideal mentor relationship for you might involve someone with whom you can speak briefly every time you have questions. Or perhaps a monthly dinner meeting would be a more productive forum for addressing ongoing issues. Over time, you might discover that your mentor is interested in joining your company as a senior executive or even a CEO if you reach a certain point of growth.

4. Spread the word as far as you can. Reach out to your email list; contacts on LinkedIn and other social networks; friends and colleagues and attendees at networking events, conferences and trade shows. Don’t rule out total strangers. If you read an interview with a like-minded business owner in a trade or business magazine, feel free to send him or her a follow-up note. As long as there is no direct issue of competition, most small business owners are happy to help a fellow entrepreneur, and might even see potential for collaborating in other ways in the future.

5. Do not overlook larger resources. The Small Business Administration, SCORE, local chambers of commerce and private mentoring businesses have wide-ranging mentoring programs that offer long-term mentoring and assistance with advisory board formation. These resources may prove to be a valuable way to connect with potential mentors.

6. Formalize the selection process. Similar to personal relationships, it’s probably best not to rush things. Start out getting to know the potential mentor, get a sense of whether they’d be open to the idea and simply ask to pick their brain on a few issues. Discuss where and how often you will meet, what you can offer to the relationship, and long- and short-term goals.

7. Remember that mentoring is a two-way street. Don’t forget to thank your mentor regularly for advice that led to good results for your business. Further, periodic feedback is a good way to keep your mentor invested in your businesses success.

Since mentors can be from different industries, or even different geographical locations, it should be relatively easy to find someone. It’s certainly less risky and time consuming than using trial and error or relying solely on your own perspective and experience. And, once you experience a positive mentoring relationship, you might look forward to the day when you can become a mentor yourself. Have you found a mentor that has helped make a difference in your business? Share your thoughts with the Apple Capital Group team in the comments section.

Whether you’re a start-up or you have been in business for a while, chances are issues will arise that you have not encountered before. You may be looking to hire a strategic partner for the first time; you may be interested in launching a social networking campaign; or you may be seeking to expand your business by tapping into a new market.

Instead of taking extensive time to research these issues on your own (or opting to plow ahead and hope for the best), you might want to consider forming a relationship with a business mentor. Sometimes the process of finding a mentor happens naturally, (i.e. someone you know socially turns out to be an expert on the business issue you’re facing). Most of the time, however, it takes a concerted effort.

The following are seven tips small business owners should remember when looking for a business mentor.

1. Narrow down the list of issues with which you need help. Prioritize your most pressing challenges so you can get the most out of a mentor relationship. You may even determine you need more than one mentor. Asking for too much information at once can overwhelm even the most generous person.

2. Pinpoint the personal qualities you think you’d respond to in a mentor. Before refining your list of potential mentors, do some soul searching and see if you can answer questions like these:

Are you interested in someone who is a good listener and doesn’t offer feedback until he or she mulls over your question?
Do you prefer people who tell you everything they know on a subject?
Is responsiveness important to you – do you want hands-on guidance in real time?
Would you prefer verbal feedback on your planned courses of action?

3. Define the parameters of the relationship. The ideal mentor relationship for you might involve someone with whom you can speak briefly every time you have questions. Or perhaps a monthly dinner meeting would be a more productive forum for addressing ongoing issues. Over time, you might discover that your mentor is interested in joining your company as a senior executive or even a CEO if you reach a certain point of growth.

4. Spread the word as far as you can. Reach out to your email list; contacts on LinkedIn and other social networks; friends and colleagues and attendees at networking events, conferences and trade shows. Don’t rule out total strangers. If you read an interview with a like-minded business owner in a trade or business magazine, feel free to send him or her a follow-up note. As long as there is no direct issue of competition, most small business owners are happy to help a fellow entrepreneur, and might even see potential for collaborating in other ways in the future.

mentor quote.png5. Do not overlook larger resources. The Small Business Administration, SCORE, local chambers of commerce and private mentoring businesses have wide-ranging mentoring programs that offer long-term mentoring and assistance with advisory board formation. These resources may prove to be a valuable way to connect with potential mentors.

6. Formalize the selection process. Similar to personal relationships, it’s probably best not to rush things. Start out getting to know the potential mentor, get a sense of whether they’d be open to the idea and simply ask to pick their brain on a few issues. Discuss where and how often you will meet, what you can offer to the relationship, and long- and short-term goals.

7. Remember that mentoring is a two-way street. Don’t forget to thank your mentor regularly for advice that led to good results for your business. Further, periodic feedback is a good way to keep your mentor invested in your businesses success.

Since mentors can be from different industries, or even different geographical locations, it should be relatively easy to find someone. It’s certainly less risky and time consuming than using trial and error or relying solely on your own perspective and experience. And, once you experience a positive mentoring relationship, you might look forward to the day when you can become a mentor yourself. Have you found a mentor that has helped make a difference in your business?