Tag Archive: family

Working From Your Home: Convincing Your Family of the Idea

Working From Your Home: Convincing Your Family of the Idea
It’s a difficult ride if you want to work from home and yet, the most important people in your life are against the work at home concept. It’s a dream to you but it can be a nightmare for people who care for you. The whole idea of not having a stable income makes them worry about you, so, don’t blame them. For all you know, you’re terribly confident that your plan will work and you know you can commit to your new work at home business…you know that but THEY don’t.

The first step you will need to take to help your family members accept your work at home decision is to understand how they feel. I know, I know, this is a time when you want others to understand you and accept your decision. You’re tired of working for someone else and want to have the freedom of spending time with your family and friends, instead of lounging around in the office day in and day out. And here I am, telling you that you should understand the very people who are opposing you?

This is not a secret but think of it like some kind of a psychological plan. ever heard of the term ‘reverse psychology’? Ok, you’re required to use this and let me tell you this…it works like a charm! If you do this right, you will convince your family members that working at home is the best option for you.

Say things like, ‘I know you care for me, love me and want what is best for me….’, ‘I understand what you’re saying…’, or ‘You’re absolutely right in saying that, I can’t say you’re wrong’. When you’re talking to them in a non-attack way, they will back down and bring down their fences. This is an amazing way to help your family members accept your work-at-home decision. It’s true, my own family members were not to keen on me wasting my law degree to start a work at home business either – to them, I am wasting my degree, wasting my talents and wasting my energy. And they don’t want to see me suffer, be disappointed and face financial problems. Being parents, they want what is best for me and in their eyes, working at home is NOT the best moneymaking opportunity. Over the years, I have finally opened my parents’ eyes to the working at home concept. They finally accepted it that I communicate with clients from all over the world and that I am being paid for the work that I do and that my income is comfortable.

As for the spouse, this is a little bit trickier. You see, in 2-income families, if one person wants to start working from home, the other spouse would have to be prepared to give up more of his or her income to cover for the stuff that is supposed to be covered by the now-working-at-home spouse. At least during the first few months of the business, that is. I mean, for 3 to 6 months after working from home, you’ll have to expect to dig into your savings or the spouse would have to cover for expenses, so, naturally, he or she would be a little bit disgruntled with the fact. They’re not being selfish – they’re trying to deal with you breaking out of the comfort zone. Everyone, including you, hates that. So, don’t expect your spouse to welcome the idea of working from home with wide open arms. There’s bound to be some skepticism.

And skepticism from your loved ones is good too because it will keep you on your toes and you’re feet remains firmly planted on the ground. So, the best thing to do with your spouse is to discuss the idea with him or her, sit down and plan the finances. For example, dig into your savings to cover for contribution to expenses, working part-time, telecommuting, cut down on expenses, selling the extra car, remortgaging, etc. Find a way and a plan to ease the discomfort for your spouse. Make sure he or she has nothing to complain about your working at home decision. It’s incredibly difficult to accept, trust me, if you’re not the one who wants to work from home. If you’re on the other side of the fence, everything looks so bleak and uncertain.

Break through their barrier not with force, but with gentle compromising and understanding. Then, you’ll get their full support for your work at home business.

Family-Run Businesses: Challenges and Opportunities

Most family-owned businesses tend to operate by the rule of thirds– only a third of them make it to the second generation, and only a third of the businesses in that group remain in business by the third generation, and so on.

If you are currently running a family business, considering joining your family’s business, or weighing the pros and cons of bringing your children into the fold, the following are some thoughts that you may want to consider, as you begin to think about what challenges you may encounter – and what opportunities could lay ahead.

Challenges

If you bring your children into a family business at a young age, you may have to walk a fine line between teaching them about hard work, working as a team and allowing them to pursue their own separate dreams.
Older members of the family may not understand or value concepts such as market share, database marketing or social networking.
Family members may have to play multiple roles, ranging from manual tasks like painting and repairs, to executive duties like negotiating partnerships or securing bank loans.
While new family businesses may require flexible work roles at the beginning, eventually you will need to outline every person’s responsibilities, compensation level, long-range goals and line of command.
Certain patterns of behavior or types of communication between family members, like one-upmanship or a tendency to correct someone’s grammar, may be played out in the business realm as well.

Opportunities

Cross-generational entrepreneurs tend to pass on traditional values such as perseverance, a willingness to get your hands dirty and ways to build trusting relationships with customers and self-sacrifice.
The choice of how much to grow your business is up to you. If you are in a family business because you enjoy the flexibility and camaraderie, you may want to keep your company small and local. If you’re in business for big profits, you may want to strive to take your business international or spin off subsidiaries.
Family-owned businesses foster resiliency as they center around a close-knit management team, which has a vested emotional and financial interest in the company’s survival.
Without pressure from shareholders, family-run businesses may be able to take more time to achieve profitability and take business risks without needing to justify decisions to others invested in the company.

Pull Quote.png