Council Observes Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Council Observes Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Council Member Cohen and Mayor Parker proclaimed Tuesday, October 7th “Wear Purple Day” in the City of Houston in observance of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Joined by Houston Area Women’s Center CEO Rebecca White and by Executive Director Rania Mankarious of Crimestoppers of Houston, Council Member Cohen noted that “Domestic violence is an issue that affects everyone, regardless of color, creed, or socio-economic status.” Houstonians interested in joining the effort to eliminate domestic violence may contact the Houston Area Women’s Center.

Email Sales Kit by JIll Konrath

Today’s crazy-busy prospects delete nearly all emails from salespeople in a nanosecond. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Crafting effective prospecting emails is a skill that you can master.

Using the strategies in the Email Sales Kit, Mark sent just one email to a CEO and 8 minutes later got a positive response. The right messaging changes everything.

osecond. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Crafting effective prospecting emails is a skill that you can master.

Using the strategies in the Email Sales Kit, Mark sent just one email to a CEO and 8 minutes later got a positive response. The right messaging changes everything.

Fill in the form to get your kit now.

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You’ll immediately discover what you’re doing that’s creating your own problems. And, you’ll find how how to change your messages so you can set up that very important initial meeting.

You’ll immediately discover what you’re doing that’s creating your own problems. And, you’ll find how how to change your messages so you can set up that very important initial meeting.

Make sure you get your Email Sales Kit today.

* You’ll also get Jill’s sales articles, read by over 130,000 sellers worldwide, delivered straight to your inbox.

 

SBA Honor an outstanding small business in your area

Release Date:  October 9, 2014 Contact:          Ahmad Goree (817) 684-5539
Release Number: -15-01 DFW Internet Address: http://www.sba.gov/news

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Honor an outstanding small business in your area

 

Dallas/Fort Worth TX– The U.S. Small Business Administration Dallas/Fort Worth District Office is seeking amazing entrepreneurs and champions of small business to honor during the 2015 National Small Business Week Awards event in May.  Nominations are being accepted through Jan. 5, 2015 at 3 pm eastern time.

 

“More than half of Americans either own or work for a small business and many of them have amazing stories to tell.  They help fuel our economy, drive innovation and increase America’s footprint in the global arena.” said Yolanda Garcia Olivarez, SBA South Central Region Administrator.  The region covers Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas with more than 3.3 million small businesses.  “Now is the time to help us single out the top entrepreneurs in your area.  These are the ones who think big, take risks and work hard to achieve the American dream, strengthen the middle class and create good paying jobs.  We want to spotlight their success.”

 

The Texas Small Business Person of the Year will be selected based on number of years in business, growth in employees, increase in sales, innovativeness of product or service, response to adversity and contributions to the community.   The  Texas award winner will go on to compete for 2015 National Small Business Person of the Year award.

 

“Every year, the  SBA Dallas/Fort Worth District Office eagerly awaits the nominations that are received from business owners, chambers, associations, and various members of the community as well as our SBA partners. There are so many entrepreneurs  that are true champions in their industry and should be recognized. It is my hope that we would have an influx of candidates this year and that the National Small Business Person of the Year comes from within  the 72 counties that the Dallas/Fort Worth Office serves.  We look forward to hearing more of the success stories in the small business community and the impact they have had on their customer base, their community and industry they serve” said Herbert Austin, SBA Dallas/Fort Worth District Director.

 

Any individual or organization dedicated to the support of the small business community in the United States may submit nominations for the following awards:

 

  1. National Small Business Person of the Year
  2. National Small Business Exporter of the Year
  3. National 8(a) Graduate of the Year
  4. National Phoenix (Disaster Recovery) Awards
  5. SBA Young Entrepreneur of the Year
  6. Family-Owned Business of the Year
  7. Entrepreneurial Success Award
  8. Financial Services Champion of the Year
  9. Home-Based Business Champion of the Year
  10. Minority Small Business Champion of the Year
  11. Veteran Small Business Champion of the Year
  12. Women in Business Champion of the Year

 

Nominees for these awards should fit the following categories:

 

Small Business Person of the Year : Any individual who owns and operates or who bears principal responsibility for operating a small business may be nominated.  Partners who jointly own and operate a small business may be nominated as a “team.”  The number of individuals in the team cannot exceed four.

 

National Small Business Exporter of the Year: An individual who owns and operates a small business engaged in exporting.

 

National 8(a) Graduate of the Year: This award recognizes a formerly certified 8(a) Business Development Program participant that graduated from the program for at least one year as of April 1, 2014.  The firm does not have to currently be a small business.

 

National Phoenix (Disaster Recovery) Awards: These awards are given to those individuals (business owners, volunteers and public officials) whose efforts and contributions have enabled their business or communities to recover successfully from a disaster.

 

SBA Young Entrepreneur of the Year:  To be considered a young entrepreneur, the individual must serve as a majority owner and operate or bear principal responsibility for operating a small business with a three year track record, and who will not have reached the age of 30 by June 1, 2014.

 

Family-Owned Business of the Year:  This award honors a family-owned and operated business which has been passed on from one generation to the next.  The owner must also serve as a majority owner and operator or bear principal responsibility with at least a 15-year track record.

 

Entrepreneurial Success Award:  Individuals must own and operate businesses initially launched as small according to SBA size standards and subsequently developed into large businesses; and they must have received SBA assistance to help the businesses grow.

 

The following Champion award nominees may or not be small business owners:

 

Financial Services Champion of the Year:  An individual who assists small businesses through advocacy efforts to increase the usefulness and availability of accounting or financial services.

 

Home-Based Business Champion of the Year:  An individual who has experienced the rewards and difficulties of owning a home-based business and has volunteered to improve the climate for these businesses may be nominated.

 

Minority Small Business Champion of the Year:  An individual who has fulfilled a commitment to the advancement of small business opportunities for minority business owners.

 

Veteran Small Business Champion of the Year:  An individual who has fulfilled a commitment to the advancement of small business opportunities for veterans of the U.S. armed forces may be nominated. Nominees may or may not be veterans.

 

Women in Business Champion of the Year:  An individual who has fulfilled a commitment to the advancement of women’s business ownership may be nominated.

 

All nominations must be submitted online, postmarked or hand delivered to the SBA no later than 3 p.m. EST, Monday, Jan. 5, 2015. Nominations may be made via the portal at http//awards.sba.gov or sent directly to SBA’s  Dallas/Fort Worth District Office at 4300 Amon Carter Blvd, Suite 114, Fort Worth, TX  76155 , (817) 684-5500) or visit online at http://www.sba.gov/offices/district/tx/dallas-fort-worth

 

For more information, contact  Ahmad Goree at (817) 684-5539 or email :ahmad.goree@sba.gov.

 

###

 

 

Elsie Collins

Deputy District Director

U.S. Small Business Administration

Dallas/Fort Worth District Office

4300 Amon Carter Blvd Suite 114

Fort Worth, TX 76155

elsie.collins@sba.gov

(817) 684-5530 Direct Line

(817) 684-5500 Main

(202) 481-4315 Fax

Free 7 Hour Training Session by Chris Widener

Friend and New York Times Best Selling Author John Assaraf, shared something that had totally transformed his life.

At age 53 he said his relationships were flourishing, his business was booming and he was in the best health of his life!

He said most people who want to increase their net worth turn to financial advisors but it turns out that the hottest new trend is the best people to turn to are…

… neuroscientists and brain experts!

In the last several years the latest brain scan technologies are capable of revealing how your pain and fear circuits are holding you back from achieving your best and how you can overcome and replace any of the negative beliefs and habits that are keeping you stuck at your current income and success level.

Your brain is split into three parts: Your Instinctual “lizard” brain that keeps you out of anything that may be painful or scary, your rational logical mind which allows you to analyze things and hopefully make good decisions… but the real aha is that your implicit emotional brain is the real decision maker when it comes to whether or not you take action or not on achieving your life’s fun or financial goals and dreams. Now here’s why this is so important…

If your emotional desires, beliefs and values don’t align with your rational (logical) or “Lizard” brain … the three parts of your brain will constantly be fighting against each other and undermining your ability to succeed at anything, especially your goals to grow and support you and your family.

This is called “Neural Dissonance”. It’s like having one foot on the gas and one foot on the brakes every day. You make some progress, then sabotage it over and over again.

If you’re struggling to break through to the next level of success and ready to take your foot off the brakes in your life … the #1 thing to do is get your logical, lizard and emotional mind working in a state of “Neural Coherence”… or harmony.

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As we move further into 2014 and almost into 2015, stay on track with your personal and business goals – Gift yourself with the opportunity to unlock your true potential using the latest brain discoveries.

Register for the Brainathon re-run today at noon Pacific Time (3:00pm Eastern Time) where you can retrain your brain for financial success, online and for free!

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Your in success,

Chris Widener

P.S. Please only share this with serious people so the live chat is filled with amazing comments and growth minded people like you. www.LessonsFromTheBrain.com

 

Widener Group, Inc Po box 2411 Issaquah, Washington 98027 United States (425) 223-3959

Why Reshoring May Be Good for Small Businesses

Wal-Mart attracted headlines earlier this year when it announced that the retail giant would spend $50 billion over a ten-year period sourcing and buying American-made goods. The goal is to help manufacturers bring production back to the U.S. from overseas—a movement known as “reshoring”.

In addition, Wal-Mart created a $10-million fund to promote American manufacturing, while also announcing that Kent International, a bike manufacturer and Wal-Mart supplier, planned to move its overseas operations from China to South Carolina, creating 175 American jobs.

Compare that to the experience of Core Products International Inc., a 26-year-old manufacturer of orthopedic soft goods and supports. In 2012, company president Philip Mattisondecided to close its 25-employee sewing and assembly facility in Mexico and bring production back to the company’s headquarters in Osceola, Wisconsin, home to 75 employees, and Chetek, Wisconsin, home to 25 employees.

The Wal-Mart decision attracted national headlines. Mattison’s decision barely made it to the local papers. Still, he says the decision to bring production back to the U.S. was the right financial move for his company. The increasing cost of offshore labor, combined with flat wages here at home since the recession, were part of the reason, he says. In addition, fuel costs have doubled, driving up freight costs in the process.

 

“We had also developed more processes and people to manage Mexican production,” says Mattison. “We often needed to send our staff to Mexico. They would travel there whenever we introduced a new item, added new equipment, or changed a process. That got expensive. It’s not nearly as effective to go offshore as some people think.”

That’s what Harry Moser emphasizes through the Reshoring Initiative, an organization he founded with the mission to bring good, well-paying manufacturing jobs back to the United States. Moser’s grandfather was a foreman and his father a manager at the Singer Sewing Machine Company factory in Elizabeth, New Jersey. Moser, who has 45 years experience in the manufacturing industry in a variety of capacities, also spent his summers working at the plant. But now, that plant is barren and Moser says “it brings tears to my eyes” to see that its production was sent overseas.

But times are changing and Moser has the numbers to prove it. In 2003, his data showed that over 150,000 American manufacturing jobs were lost per year to offshoring, while only 2,000 were gained from reshoring. In 2016, Moser’s data estimates that just 20,000 manufacturing jobs per year will be lost to offshoring, while 70,000 new jobs will be created in America because of reshoring.

To help companies of all sizes decide if reshoring makes financial sense, Moser helped create The Total Cost of Ownership Estimator, a user-friendly software program to walk owners through the process.

“When considering increasing transportation and fuel costs, increasing overseas wage rates, high reject rates, substandard quality issues and unreliable timelines and deliveries, plus a number of other hidden costs, the total cost of manufacturing in developing countries can be greater than most realize,” he says.

Patrick Van Den Bossche, a partner with A.T. Kearney, a leading global management consulting firm, says economic change and labor and currency issues have led to increasing costs in many developing countries, while energy and other costs have become more competitive in the U.S. Other factors, including the need for shorter delivery times and a renewed consumer interest in buying “Made in the USA” products, are making companies at least consider reshoring operations.

 

“There is a recent increase in cases mentioning the need to improve their image and/or brand by moving back to the U.S.,” says Van Den Bossche.

AT Kearney has a proprietary database of over 700 cases where companies reshored. Based on that database, the industries where reshoring is occurring the most include:

  1. Electrical/appliance
  2. Transportation equipment
  3. Apparel
  4. Computer/electronic
  5. Plastics & rubber
  6. Fabricated metal

 

Reshoring has its challenges

“Reshoring is certainly not a one-size-fits-all solution and executives should consider the specific characteristics and value proposition of their own business model to see if it fits them,” says Van Den Bossche.

And even if reshoring may fit a business model today, that may not be the case a few years down the road, he adds. In order to establish a successful strategy, business owners should first identify and understand the key drivers that will determine if reshoring will make sense in the future.

Using Moser’s Total Cost of Ownership Estimator is a good place to start. Being back in the United States is a good place to end, says Mattison, who added that closing down the Mexico plant didn’t come without costs. It took nearly three months to move all equipment back to the U.S., and every piece with a serial number had to get cleared through customs before it was sent back to Wisconsin.

“People don’t want to get out of their comfort zone,” says Mattison. “So it’s hard for them to see the benefit of reshoring. But in manufacturing you have to think long-term.”

In the meantime, his two American plants are able to produce the same amount of product at the same cost as when the company was manufacturing in Mexico, Mattison says. “Because of automation and the skilled American workforce, our operations in Mexico couldn’t come near the production capacity that we have in the U.S.,” adds Mattison. “It just made sense for us.”

4 Core Leadership Values

4 Core Leadership Values

I had the privilege of speaking just before former United Nations Ambassador and former Presidential Candidate, Alan Keyes at a leadership conference in Whistler, British Columbia.

 

Ambassador Keyes gave a brilliant speech as usual and challenged the audience with the idea that the only way people, businesses, organizations, and even countries make lasting impact is by operating out of core values and bedrock principles.

 

This got me thinking about core values of successful leaders. Successful leaders make a difference, not only for themselves, but for others as well.

 

So what are the core values that I have seen in the many successful leaders that I have worked with through the years? Here are four core values that virtually guarantee your success in leadership and life:

 

  1. They are honest. They are not corner-cutters or “little-white-lie-tellers.” In fact, They have no problems with the truth. They stand on it and declare it.

 

Being an honest person takes being at ease with and confident of yourself. It requires a trust that no matter what the truth may bring, things will turn out for the best.

 

When you are confident of yourself and know that the best will turn out, you have no problem telling the truth at all times.

 

This brings you to a place where people know the real you. It allows them to follow you with assurance. It strengthens relationships, upon which your success rests. It allows you to look yourself in the mirror and see the same person in the mirror that is standing on the floor before it. This builds on itself and enables you to be even more confident and move even more quickly toward your successful future.

 

Make a commitment to being honest and you make a commitment to your own success.

 

  1. They are givers, not takers. Successful leaders set their minds and wills upon serving others the best they can. They realized one of the most universal principles in the world: you reap what you sow. They know that when they give to others, others give back. The reverse is true as well. When you take from others, they try to keep what you are trying to take.

 

Make a commitment to being a giver and not a taker, and you are making a commitment to your own success.

 

  1. They are bust-their-tails, hard workers. Very few people become successful without hard work. History shows that the people who achieve the most success have as a core value the desire to work hard.

 

One point: They don’t just work hard in order to get the return, though they do indeed do that. The also work hard because they believe in hard work as an ethic and value. They know and appreciate that hard work produces character in them, excellence in their product, and satisfaction for those who benefit from their work. So they operate out of the value of hard work.

 

Make a commitment to hard work and you make a commitment to your own success.

 

  1. They do what is right. Successful leaders are people with a core, people with a rod of strength and integrity that runs right through them. It causes them to see that this world of ours needs people who will do what is right, play by the rules, fight for what is true and still take time to care for the little guy and the underdog. Yes, good guys do finish first after all. And when, on those few occasions they don’t, they decide that they would still do it the same way all over again. Why? Because it is the right thing to do. Believe it or not, even with all of the scandalous behavior that we read about in the newspapers every day, good people are still the backbone of society. They are what make it work and make it benefit everyone.

 

Make a commitment to doing what is right, and you make a commitment to your own success.

 

Sure there are lots of values that we should strive to hold on to, but start with these four and you will be well on your way to achieving the kind of life that you desire!

 

To gain greater results in the teams you lead, the influence you have and the relationships that are important to you (and much more) I would like to invite you to be a part of my Transformational Leadership Program at a Special 70% off. Access here!

 

To your success,

 

Chris Widener

 

P.S. Don’t miss this special offer! Gain greater results in the teams you lead, the influence you have and the relationships that are important to you (and much more). Access here!

 

 

Widener Group, Inc Po box 2411 Issaquah, Washington 98027 United States (425) 223-3959

Should I Buy Into a Franchise?

Should I Buy Into a Franchise?”

Wednesday, Sept 24th
9:30 a.m. -11:30 a.m.
REGISTRATION REQUIRED

If you are seriously considering business ownership – and specifically
franchise ownership – then this workshop is for you.

Join Sara Waskow, Franchise Specialist with FranNet of Dallas/Fort Worth, as she presents:
Should I Buy Into a Franchise?
* What are advantages and disadvantages of the 3 types of businesses?
* Is franchising right for me?
* What are the growth trends? Where are the good opportunities?
* How are franchise investments financed? Where is the money?
* How do I safely and affordably invest in a franchise?

James E. Guinn Complex
1150 South Freeway·
Ft. Worth. TX 76104

You MUST pre-register. Fee: $25.00
Space is limited. Reserve your seat now

Questions? Contact Sara.
Sara Waskow
Franchise Specialist
FranNet of Dallas/Fort Worth
817-821-7997
swaskow@frannet.com
http://www.frannetdfw.com
Facebook Fan Page: FranNet of Dallas/Fort Worth